I won’t be able to attend the next Stitch n bitch as I’ll be in Brisbane. However I found this recently and wanted to share:

DNA scarf by Superhooker

DNA scarf by Superhooker

The DNA Scarf by Superhooker was recently featured on Geek Crafts. The pattern is here.

It was knitting week on SheldonComics ^_^

http://www.sheldoncomics.com/archive/100715.html

http://www.sheldoncomics.com/archive/100713.html

http://www.sheldoncomics.com/archive/100714.html

http://www.sheldoncomics.com/archive/100712.html

Here’s my woven stitch scarf with special wooden button

Our little Stitch n bitch sessions are fun and we’re a loyal crew, but they’re modestly attended. Not like a recent Mets game, where 400 crocheters set the Guinness world record for the most people crocheting in the same place. These crocheting events at sports games are regular, and known imaginatively as ‘stitch n pitch’.

If we taught handicrafts as part of Orientation, I think we could beat that figure. Just another useful skill students could learn from the Library :-)

We have been neglecting the poor blog :(

These are not as labour intensive as Robin’s lovely handspun ones, but here are the blue fingerless ones I made for Dana last weekHere they are on Ravelry

I think I’ll knit a 20cm square (or more than one?) for this http://www.savethechildren.org.au/what-you-can-do/campaigns/knit-one-save-one.html

That’s 2 good causes helped – kids kept warm/stash reduced – win/win.

UPDATE – squares have to be in by 31 August 2010.

This immediately made me think of all the amazing amigurumi experts in the Library:

cute kawaii stuff - Amigurumi Snail
more from Must Have Cute …

Apparently it was crocheted on a 0.4mm hook using sewing thread. More ‘nano amigurumi’ available from here.

My thoughts on  why circular knitting needles are great – if anyone is interested – enjoy ^_^

Read on my blog

Striped beanieAfter my on-again off-again vest, it was quite exciting to finish this in just 5 days! I reckon I need a few small projects for small wins along the way while I’m working on something bigger.  Anyway, I’m quite happy with how this turned out and it’s ready just in time for crisp morning dog walks. Wonder if it would fit under my bike helmet too?

The hat is in Rowan Felted Tweed and the pattern is by Martin Storey from a Rowan book Classic knits for men. Unfortunately all the lovely jumpers in the book begin at large size and go up to massive so I’ll have to stick to the smaller projects.

(Dear Rowan, your designs are beautiful but we aren’t all built like rugby players. Can we have some more modest sizes as well please?)

The beanie is knitted flat and then seamed. This is my first seam, which started off far better than I expected, then went a tiny bit wonky because I made the edge stitches too tight.

Although it was only a small project I still managed to make an astonishing number of mistakes but retrieved the situation thanks to the plain-speaking advice of Maggie Righetti in her book Knitting in plain English. So here’s one of Maggie’s tips…

You know when you have to rip back, because you’ve been paying too much attention to RuPaul’s Drag race on TV and you’ve messed up the stripes? When I rip it back and then pick up the stitches I always seem to get my needle back into the stitches so it’s pointing the wrong way. Maggie suggests getting a small circular needle and using that to pick up the stitches. That way you can never have the needle pointing the wrong way. Genius!

I got a 2 mm circular needle which worked great.  Once the stitches are safely back on the circular needle, just slip them purlwise onto the correct needle and you’re good to go. As you slip the stitches you can easily spot any twisted stitches and fix them before you start again.

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